The World Is Our Classroom: Learning at the Park

Dear Homeschooler,Learning at the park

I, like most homeschoolers I’ve met, believe the homeschool adage ‘the world is our classroom’ to be true. Learning doesn’t stop because we leave the classroom. In fact, different environments can actually spur learning by sparking curiosity in a new topic, expanding lessons already learned, or helping to generalize skills.

Today, we went to the park, and although this is a fairly regular occurrence, I was struck with just how much learning we did there. Sometimes, we will bring our school books to the park and just sit under a tree or at a picnic table and do lessons or read, but with some guided play, we can do a lot of learning without books.

 

Learning at the Park: Math

  • Counting pushes on the swing
  • Chanting skip counting by 2s, 3s, etc. while swinging
  • Writing numbers in the sand
  • Finding shapes and colors in the playground equipment (or surrounding area)
  • Counting objects like leaves, rocks, etc. and practice simple addition and subtraction equations
  • Saying a number and find that many of any object (leaves, seeds, etc.)

Learning at the Park: Literacy

  • Drawing letters in the sand or making letters using sticks
  • Singing ABCs on the swing
  • Practicing letter sounds by songs on the swing or by drawing them in the sand
  • Spelling words in the sand
  • Reading words on signs

 

Learning at the Park: Science

  • Working on observation skills by playing ‘I Spy’
  • Seeing how many different kinds of plants or animals we can find
  • Looking for animal tracks or nests
  • Gathering as many different leaves we can find
  • Noticing signs of the season (Are trees budding? Are leaves falling? Are squirrels gathering food for winter?)

Learning at the Park: Motor Skills and Exercise

  • Building upper body strength on the monkey bars
  • Climbing trees
  • Practicing balance
  • Making obstacle courses on the playground equipment

Learning at the park
Learning at the Park: Social Skills

  • Introducing oneself and making new friends
  • Playing games like tag, hide-and-seek, etc. with new friends
  • Taking turns

These are just a few of the activities we have done at the park. I will admit, it is probably more appropriate for toddlers, preschoolers, and those students in early elementary levels. Older students can bring their studies along and enjoy the change of scenery.

What learning have you done at the park? Tell me about it below.

Till Next Time,

Jennifer

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